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Does nonqualified workers wear ER gloves to operate a fused switch <100A?
Yes, Gloves required
No, Gloves not required
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ekstra   ara
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 7:01 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:58 am
Posts: 1103
Location: Charlotte, NC
THE CABLE GUY wrote:
ZOG, when you speak of a remote controlled throw on a switch in some cases from other postings. Is this for a molded case circuit breaker? Like a remote test pushbutton to trip the breaker?

I cannot find a link to industrial 3 ph safety switches that contain a remote throw device. :( Maybe it's a miss-understanding in my understanding of what exactly is a remote controlled throw switch. I know of using a bus plug switch elevated with a handle so the switch can be operated with a pull chain or a hot stick device attached to the handle.

If you or anyone else know of such a device as a remote controlled throw for a safety switch 30-600A could you attach a link.

Question, would a remote controlled throw turn on and off a switch. If nothing like this is available I'll have to create one. :)


We make them for over 100 different applications, we don't advertise them because we are having a hard time maling them fast enough the way it is.

I will send you some stuff PM me your email address and what specific application you need.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 8:34 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:00 pm
Posts: 108
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
I would like to voice a concern that we must consider "risk" not just that there may be 4 cal/cm2 there.

My concern is that we must ensure we don't create a situation where no one will even switch on or off a light switch.

Normally all electrical equipment as long as it is "approved" and is installed to the CEC or the NEC is safe. The probability of an "abnormal" condition with respect to the electrical equipment is what the worker must assess using a document Hazard Task Analysis process, and consider such things as maintenance, age, environment the equipment is installed in etc...

We need non-electrical workers to be able to switch and isolation for lockout and tagging. We need the MCC Building/Room doors to be left open for emergency isolation purposes etc...

What I recommend is that a written procedure be put into place for Circuit Breaker and Disconnect Switch operation under normal conditions. No Electrical Specific PPE, Tools or Equipement is required unless the Hazard Task Analysis identifies it as required, you should never need rubber insulating gloves with leather protectors as long as the electrical equipment is in normal conditions (no open door for example).

The procedure should identify that under abnormal conditions an electrical workers should be involved: overcurrent trips, overload resets when the door must be opened, protective relay trip root cause investigation and reset, and power fuses blown root cause investigation and replaced by an electrical worker only.

I use an Electrical Safe Work Procedure template that includes a simple risk assessment process for each step.

Regards;
Terry Becker, P.Eng.
Owner
ESPS Electrical Safety Program Solutions INC.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 5:00 pm
Posts: 108
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Need for rubber insulating gloves with leather protectors?

What is missing right now in industry is the application of "Risk Analysis/Ranking" related to the probability of an arc flash being initiated. We need to ensure practical and appropriate application of CSA Z462 or NFPA 70E.

What is the probability of an arc flash been initiated when I interact with electrical equipment? What is the difference between "normal" and "abnormal" conditions of energized electrical equipment? How does one apply the "Risk Analysis/Ranking" concept to the overall analysis are the arc flash hazard?

You don't need arc flash clothing for opening and closing LV circuit breakers and I believe 4160V, and 13800V breakers in my opinion. The probablity has to be assessed against: operating environment, procedure used, maintenance completed, age, training, etc... There is no shock hazard.

This is also the case when walking in front of energized electrical equipment, you don't need any arc rated clothing.

Your Electrical Safety Program will define the "rules" you apply based on "Risk Assessment/Ranking." I think you will see the concept or this evolving it needs to happen.

Just because you have applied a label that says 25 cal/cm2 incident energy at 18" working distance, and AFPB of 48" doesn't imply that the electrical equipment will arc flash. If we wronging assume that normally there is a high probability of electrical equipment arc flashing under normal operating conditions we need to take a outward look at other things in our life that are truly high risk (e.g. driving to work). We don't want workers to be fearful of electrical equipment.

The concept of Risk Assessment/Ranking was highlighted in several papers an discussions at the IEEE Electrical Safety Work shop last week.

Terry Becker, P.Eng.
ESPS Electrical Safety Program Solutions INC.
terry.becker@espsi.ca
403-465-3777


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