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 Post subject: Ppe requirements
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 6:32 am 
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If I perform an incident energy calculation per IEEE1584, am I obligated to determine the PPE from the results of this calculation or can I determine the PPE from the tables in NFPA 70E?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 6:54 am 
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ronmwilliams wrote:
If I perform an incident energy calculation per IEEE1584, am I obligated to determine the PPE from the results of this calculation or can I determine the PPE from the tables in NFPA 70E?


Once you have identified the Ei you need to waer the PPE rated to that. You can't go back to the tables to use a lower HRC than your study showed, thats just dangerous. However, I don;t see why you could not use a higher HRC.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 1:18 pm 
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ronmwilliams
Quote:
If I perform an incident energy calculation per IEEE1584, am I obligated to determine the PPE from the results of this calculation or can I determine the PPE from the tables in NFPA 70E?


Ron, (obligated?) In my opinion, (IMO) your obligation is to make reasonable data based calculations on the equipment towards the Ie & recommended PPE. Not based on assumptions such as the charts.

I am not sure there is any legal obligation that you cannot mix the two HRC’s but the general engineering consensus and best work practices is one or the other but not both.

IMO, NFPA70E charts can be used as a stop gap until the energy calculations are completed.

Something you must understand is that the 70E charts are based on available fault current value not to exceed ## & upstream fault clearing time limits. You have to read the fine print and notations to find this at the end of the charts. If you do not have this data documented for calculations to determine the fault current, then the charts becomes no more then a guess towards the PPE required. Maybe to much, maybe to little PPE?

As Zog said adding more PPE is discretionary but to a limit. Excessive PPE can create an increased risk for the worker to safely perform some task.

That’s why I say an energy study and hazard analysis would best determine your end result for PPE. I believe this would be a general consensus of thought.
Thanks,


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:18 pm 
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If we have HRC from 0 up to dangerous. What kind of PPE and how many we should order for a hospital project? Let's the we have about 1000 panels. Any suggestion?


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:01 pm 
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What are you asking?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 7:20 am 
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Normally how do you suggest your clients to buy PPE? Would you suggest buying HRC# 1 to #4 for everyone electrician? Any general suggestion?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:53 pm 
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PPE strategies

Noah wrote:
Normally how do you suggest your clients to buy PPE? Would you suggest buying HRC# 1 to #4 for everyone electrician? Any general suggestion?


Many people (including my site) use a 2 system approach:
Standard issue PPE consists of shirt and pant or coveralls rated at HRC 2. This provides protection of at least 8 cal. Included in the standard issue is an arc rated face shield and gloves rated to the voltages encountered in the workplace. We also supply all electricians with arc rated jackets, parkas and insulated pants due to the weather extremes.
The 2nd set of PPE is rated at 40 cal and includes coat, pants and hood. The gloves are universal to the two sets.
Everyone gets their own set of PPE so there's no fighting about sweat, smells, or other cooties.
To give you an idea of cost - 2 changes of HRC 2 shirt and pants or coveralls will probably cost over $200 per employee. We have over 500 employees and provide 2 sets per year to everyone.
Finding PPE and outfitting for all four levels can be done but is prohibitively expensive and complicated to manage. It's better to look at you potential hazards and make the PPE fit the majority of hazards encountered. Any exceptional hazards probably need to be dealt with in a different fashion (remote racking, etc.)


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