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 Post subject: NEC 110.16 arc flash warning label requirement
PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 1:04 pm 

Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2011 5:00 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Vermilion Ohio
NEC 110.16 arc flash warning label requirement mean that the engineer/designer/contractor must label equipment or is that up to the owner? If the owner or installation contractor does not want a Arc Flash study done or labels on the equipment and an injury or accident takes place will the Design Engineer or PE be held responsible?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2011 6:58 pm 

Joined: Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:10 am
Posts: 23
The warning label required by NEC 110.16 need not be any more complex than something that says "Warning- Arc Flash Hazard", IMO.

It is something independent of the IE calculations, simply to serve as a reminder. And rightly required, as it is still rare to find a small facility that has completed a full study, while a simple AF sticker costs about a buck.

It is a band-aid for sure, just to push our industry toward even being aware of the potential problems.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2011 5:30 am 

Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2011 5:00 pm
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Location: Vermilion Ohio
Volta wrote:
The warning label required by NEC 110.16 need not be any more complex than something that says "Warning- Arc Flash Hazard", IMO.

It is something independent of the IE calculations, simply to serve as a reminder. And rightly required, as it is still rare to find a small facility that has completed a full study, while a simple AF sticker costs about a buck.

It is a band-aid for sure, just to push our industry toward even being aware of the potential problems.


* * * * * * * *

How do you handle both FPN No.1 and 2? Which require more than a generic label.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2011 8:37 am 
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Location: Wisconsin
JBK89UT wrote:
* * * * * * * *

How do you handle both FPN No.1 and 2? Which required more than a generic label.


Fine Print Notes and other informational content is not part of the Code, and therefore can be ignored.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2011 8:51 am 
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Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina
JBD wrote:
Fine Print Notes and other informational content is not part of the Code, and therefore can be ignored.

True, the notes are not part of the Code, but the Code does not say what has to be on the warning labels, and the notes reference NFPA 70E which does say what needs to be on the warning labels. Are you confident that a jury would not consider the notes in their deliberations?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2011 1:03 pm 
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jghrist wrote:
True, the notes are not part of the Code, but the Code does not say what has to be on the warning labels, and the notes reference NFPA 70E which does say what needs to be on the warning labels. Are you confident that a jury would not consider the notes in their deliberations?


Yes I am.

However, not installing a label per the facilities/end user's 'safe work practice', would not be defensible, in my opinion.


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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 10:07 am 
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OSHA and the courts consider what a "prudent and reasonable" employer would do to protect his/her workers from an arc flash. Typically, liability is the issue here and actions occur in response to an accident. OSHA states in their 3075 publication that it relies on the NFPA 70 and NFPA 70E for setting many electrical safety standards, which includes arc flash labeling.

If you are an employer, you would be held accountable for not following NFPA 70/NEC 110 standards when an accident occurs. Even when your employees are working in an environment that you do not own, it is ultimately your responsibility to ensure your workers are not exposed to non-labeled locations meeting NFPA 70/NEC 110 labeling requirements. The owner of the property is mainly responsible for protecting his or her own employees, but may also share some responsibility in the courts.


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