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 Post subject: Equipment Designation Methods?
PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2012 1:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:47 am
Posts: 5
How does your company name/label different equipment? I am asking this question as our company is in the middle of a comprehensive arc flash study and we are still collecting data. I just figured this would be a good time to come up with a system for naming all of our electrical equipment.

Currently there is no system in place. We have 15 sites all of which are hundreds of miles apart but they have very similar layouts and designs. However, at site “A” a panel may be called “Main Distribution Panel” or “MDP”. Whereas at site “B” the panel that does exactly the same thing may be called “Panel 1”.
My goal is to rename all of our equipment in a way that makes sense and provides some basic information as to the equipment’s location and perhaps circuit branch that is powering it. The end result would be something resembling a serial number (letters are fine as well).

Anyways any good examples to follow would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Allan


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:01 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 9:54 am
Posts: 8
Location: Plano,Texas
When you decide how, write down your idea. Our campus is over 50 years old and we have a variety of methods being used. It doesn't help that the buildings have changed owner/tenants/management several time and they didn't update or consult the one-line diagrams. Changing any places naming convention means you have to redo all the panel schedules and labeling on outlets, lighting circuits, etc. which is best done when the building is gutted for remodeling.

Some of our panels are labeled by panel and breaker feeding it such as C-8 which would be Sub C breaker 8. A panel fed from that panel off breaker 1 would be C-8-1. It's nice if you are meticulous with the labeling since you know the source. It sucks if you have to move breakers around for any reason because all your downstream panel schedules and branch circuit drawings have to be redone.

Other places we have MDP for main distribution panels off the subs, EDP for higher voltage emergency power, EP for 120v emergency power, LP for lighting panels, and lots of Panel A, B, C and so on. They tried using A-Z for manufacturing areas and numbers for office areas I think but various remodels and other changes messed all that up.

For location the buildings are setup on grids, the older ones by columns and the newer ones in 1 foot increments with 0,0 being in one corner, usually by the lobby entrance. Engraved plastic signs label the columns throughout all the buildings. A panel at 5v150 would be 5 units north and 150 units east from one with 0,0 in the sw corner.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 5:17 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2008 6:06 am
Posts: 136
Location: Michigan
We have nine manufacturing facilities all within close proximity that use the same ERP. We wanted to assign asset numbers to some equipment but could not have multiple pieces of equipment with the same name. Each building is assigned unique a two digit identification code which is used for other applications such as inventory locations, time clock designations, etc. This code was then included in the naming of some equipment. For example: the building at 1900 Hayes St. is designated code 19, the building at 1835 Hayes St. is designated code 18.

We used SVCE to designate a building’s electrical service; each building may have anywhere from 1-5 services. For example, SVCE 19.01 is service one at the 1900 plant, while service two at the 1900 plant is designated SVCE 19.02. The 1835 plant will also have a service one and two and they are named SVCE 18.01 and SVCE 18.02. These names allow us to still have a service number one in each building but a unique name which also identifies the building.

Our buses and breaker panels had names but they didn’t always mean something so we renamed most of them. (These names are not building specific.) All of our columns in each building have an alphanumeric number (first row A1, A2, A3, etc. next row B1, B2, B3 etc.) which indicate a physical location in the plant. So a breaker panel located on or near column G9 became BP-G9 or if it was for lighting then it was designated LP-G9 or a distribution panel would be DP-G9. The same goes for buses; they are each named according to the building column nearest the bus’ tap box and we also numbered all the tap positions on each bus.

This has greatly helped whenever required to track down where a circuit is fed from and makes it easy to de-energize. For example, the main electrical panel for a machine will have a label that states the equipment name such as WELDER232 in bold print, and then underneath in regular font it says BUS C26-24 which indicates where this panel is fed from (the bus near column C26, switch position 24). Each bus tap box has a label identifying the bus such as Bus C26 and then underneath it says SCVE 19.03 to identify the service this bus is fed from. The service has a label identifying it as SVCE 19.03 and underneath it says XFMR-16 indicating the pad-mounted transformer outside. The transformer outside has a label identifying it as XFMR-16 and underneath it says PRI SW 19-3 to indicate which primary switch is needed to de-energize this transformer.

We also have tags on all 480V bus drops which identify their disconnecting means; example: Bus H22-56. Even 120V receptacle and light switch covers get a small label such as BP-G9 CKT#5 or LP-A2 CKT#10; this part is just happening for new installations and is ongoing for existing circuits as we come across them.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 11:37 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:47 am
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Thanks, for the responses. I will have to think about it some more. The higher ups don't want me spending a lot of time on this so it may never happen. But we can dream... It is also made more difficult though because all of our sites have double or triple redundant power distribution so a piece of equipment may actually be fed by two or three power distribution panels.


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