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 Post subject: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 10:37 am 
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Location: Riverside California
When is the 2015 edition adopted? Can we still refer to the 2012 edition?
Can we still use the 2012 Table H.3 Informative Annex H


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 11:00 am 
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Location: Port Huron, Michigan
Whether 2015 has been adopted yet is up to your AHJ (authority having jurisdiction). 2015 is a live standard, however.


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 12:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 2:04 pm
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Location: Riverside California
Thank you...I want to protect and educate my apprentices and journeyman. We are in Southern California where we are working on alot of solar projects where rubber insulated gloves are a must on the 800volt DC systems.


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 1:05 pm 
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According to NPFA 70E page 70E-1
"It was issued by the Standards Council on July 14, 2014, with an effective date of July 29, 2014, and supersedes all previous editions."


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:41 am 
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When it comes to NFPA 70 (NEC), it has precise adoption date. For instance, in California we use CEC 2013 which is based on NEC 2011. NEC 2014 was released last year on 8/1/2013 and so far 36 states had adopted it. And on July 1st 2016, California Electric Code 2016 will be released and it will be based on NEC 2014 and its effective date in California is January 1st 2017. However, when it comes to NFPA 70E, although NFPA 70E has mentioned "It was issued by the Standards Council on July 14, 2014, with an effective date of July 29, 2014, and supersedes all previous editions", it has to do with something called Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). And AHJ consist quite a number of working organization like local private fire dept, state education dept, county health, county building dept, state fire marshal, city inspector, etc, the list goes on. I talked to bunch of these people and didn't get anywhere. When I corresponded with corresponded with NFPA, this is what they wrote:"NFPA 's effective date of the NFPA 70E 2015 is September 22, 2014. The effective date for each state depends on the Authority Having Jurisdiction. This may not be the fire Marshal. It may be the local authorities ie: city inspectors or even OSHA. You may wan to try and contact one of these to see which edition of NFPA 70E they are working from.” Then I look for State OSHA and this is what they wrote to me: "I’m sorry I don’t have that information, please try www.nfpa.org"
NFPA 70E is a voluntary standard for electrical safety and I always felt that the latest edition should be used, so I went to Ca OSHA and contacted Region 2 (http://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/DistrictOffices.htm) since m in Sacramento. A gentleman said that there is no effective date of NFPA 70E written in black and white from them, but they advise to use the latest edition for electrical safety, so m already using it. If you are using SKM Power*Tools software, they have already updated the software per NFPA 70E 2015. The only delay that I can think of AHJ's is may be they may take sometime to re-write their electrical work practice manual based on latest NFPA 70E.


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 8:23 am 
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Location: North Carolina
You're barking up the wrong tree somewhat. The local AHJ that we are usually familiar with ("Code inspectors" office) is charged with enforcing installation standards so we're dealing with IBC, BOCA, NEC, NESC, NFPA 101, etc. Their responsibility is towards the "public", NOT protection of employees. They may inspect a work site but generally don't take much enforcement action at all. The process ultimately boils down to issuing permits and performing inspections and finally issuing occupancy permits based on the inspection process. It is very formal and contractual in nature and Code adoption is similar.

The "work rule" codes are very different, of which NESC is to some degree and 70E definitely is. The agencies involved are OSHA and local state labor organizations that may work in conjunction with OSHA. OSHA does maintain lists of some recognized standards for some things such as signage (Z535) and references lots of ASTM standards for PPE. Codes often have specific dates. OSHA can't really use phrases like "latest edition" because this is vague and could down the road create an open door for many new restrictions that were not previously addressed via the administrative rule making procedures. These dates change VERY slowly and are often years or even decades out of date. For instance most of Subchapter S electrical work rules are based on a pre-2000 edition of 70E. The catch here is that OSHA also charges employers with protecting employees against "recognized" hazards. So even if the regulations don't specifically address it, OSHA can still use a recognized safety standard and take enforcement actions based on it. This sort of catch-all phrasing means that the latest edition of a particular set of work rules or a reasonably recent edition is the standard that OSHA will recognize. Generally even if OSHA references say a 1980's edition of a particular Code they will accept a more recent edition. If you have a fatality at your site (I have) and you have a discussion about safety with an OSHA inspector, one of the points of discussion will be about which standard should be adopted as sufficient. I have found MSHA to be pretty rigid on the subject but OSHA inspectors seem to be much more open mininded and more interested in the fact that you are following a standad than the particulars of which one.

The worst offender of this is MSHA. MSHA still goes by the 1968 edition of NEC. This is their entire policy related to the 1968 edition of the NEC and ampacity of power cables for underground mining equipment:

77.503 Electric Conductors
Section 77.503 requires that, "electric conductors shall be sufficient in size and have adequate current carrying capacity and be of such construction that a rise in temperature resulting from normal operation will not damage the insulating materials."Section 77.503-1 outlines the term "sufficient" and states that electric conductors must "meet the minimum current carrying capacity provided for in the National Electric Code, 1968"(emphasis added). While Section 77.503 states general ampacity and conductor size requirements, Section 77.503-1 incorporates the specific minimum requirements of standards promulgated by consensus standards organizations.

Since publication of the 1968 NEC, technological advances in power cable manufacture have been made. Insulated conductors having better grades of insulation and temperature ratings have been developed which far exceed the capabilities of conductors addressed by the 1968 NEC. Therefore, ampacity tables for insulated conductors other than trailing cables used on the surface and manufactured in accordance with minimum NEC standards, or which meet the more general safety test of Section 77.503 are acceptable.

For example, conductors manufactured in accordance with the Insulated Cable Engineers Association (ICEA) standards, which conform to the ICEA ampacity tables or other nationally recognized standards would be acceptable as meeting the requirements of Section 77.503. Enforcement action should not be taken if cables do not meet the specifics of the 1968 NEC ampacity and temperature rating standards, but equal or surpass the minimum level of safety afforded by compliance with the NEC.This enforcement policy will allow the use of newly-designed electric conductors which are not addressed by the 1968 NEC, but which do comply with Section 77.503 and offer equal or greater miner protection.

Trailing cables are required to meet the minimum capacity requirements of the Insulated Power Cable Engineers Association(IPCEA) - National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA)standards. This policy does not affect MSHA's treatment of trailing cables.


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 Post subject: Re: When is the 2015 edition adopted?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:09 am 
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Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2014 2:04 pm
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Location: Riverside California
Thank you for replying to my question of the date to adopt the NFPA 2015 70E.
I am constantly learning everything I can to train my electricians in safety as well as the laws that enforce the safe and healthy work environment of recognized hazards.
Being in California it is extremely important to me to make the electricians I train understand the importance concerning our labor laws and assembly bills for safety and health of the employees


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