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 Post subject: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2015 7:18 pm 
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Hi Friends,
So far, 24 States have adopted NEC 2014. I live in California and we have California Electric Code (CEC Edition 2013), which is based on NEC 2011. CEC 2016 will be released on 7/1/2016 and it will be based on NEC 2014. Therefore, NEC 2014 will be effective in California only around 1/1/2017. The NEC 2014, Article 240.87 specifically calls for requirement of arc-energy reduction for all circuit breakers that are rated 1200A or higher. NEC 2011, Article 240.87 mentions Zone selective interlocking, Differential relaying & energy-reduction maintenance switching requirement if the breaker does not have instantaneous trip settings. It does not mention the threshold of the breaker ratings either. And are my questions:
1. For those of us, who are using NEC 2011, would it be an issue if we practice Article 240.87 arc flash mitigation from NEC 2014 Edition, prior to its adoption?
2. What should we do with the equipment (Switchgear/Switchboard/MCC/Panelboard) in the field that have Circuit Breakers with trip ratings of 1200A or higher and does not have arc-energy reduction mechanism (NEC 2011 & previous editions)?


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 Post subject: Re: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2015 8:24 am 
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You asked, 1. For those of us, who are using NEC 2011, would it be an issue if we practice Article 240.87 arc flash mitigation from NEC 2014 Edition, prior to its adoption? No, that would not be a problem is you started implementing this Code Article. It will make your distribution system safer to work on.
2. What should we do with the equipment (Switchgear/Switchboard/MCC/Panelboard) in the field that have Circuit Breakers with trip ratings of 1200A or higher and does not have arc-energy reduction mechanism (NEC 2011 & previous editions)? Most electrical codes allow you to grandfather in old equipment. Which means, the old equipment would not have to be changed or upgraded. However, any new equipment that is installed will have to meet this new section of code.

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Robert Fuhr, P.E.; P.Eng.
PowerStudies


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 Post subject: Re: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2015 11:07 am 
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Thanks Bob! Good info. There is some additional information about NEC Article 240.87 at the post below:

Article 240.87 Forum Post


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 Post subject: Re: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 10:07 am 
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"Most electrical codes allow you to grandfather in old equipment"

I am not aware that ANY actually do that.
It is the AHJs that allow "grandfathering", and could if the whim took them, require the change.
Admittedly there would be a LOT of pushback on that. :D

If you look at it strictly from a safety perspective, they ought to either be enforcing "it" across the board, or not at all.
{regardless of which "it" you are talking about}

If an AHJ can not figure out if there is an "inst" function, [and if it is turned on], are they going to be able to figure out if there is a ZSI function, AND if it is turned on, AND if it is wired in,[And if it is actually functional] or any of the other options.

Additionally should there not also be a performance testing requirement similart to the requirement for GF at service entrances?


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 Post subject: Re: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 12:40 pm 
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JKlessig wrote:
"Most electrical codes allow you to grandfather in old equipment"

I am not aware that ANY actually do that.


Our state electrical code contains language that says: " Existing electrical installations
shall conform to the electrical code that applied when the installations were installed. An existing electrical installation may be required to be brought into compliance with the current codes requirements by the department and within the time period determined by the department when a hazard to life, health or property exists or is created by the installation."


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 Post subject: Re: NFPA 70 (NEC 2014) Article 240.87
PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 10:18 pm 
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That's generally the rule everywhere. If nothing else, its impossible to enforce otherwise. Imagine trying to force every homeowner in the country, especially those without kids under 5, to replace ALL receptacles with the new tamper resistant ones. Whenever modifications are done though then pulling permits triggers bringing affected equipment up to Code. FHA also enforces some building Code requirements on purchase of a house with an FHA loan for new home buyers but not all. Most industrial sites are also balking at the proliferation of new Code requirements on labels.


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