It is currently Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:52 am



Post new topic Reply to topic
Author Message
ekstra   ara
 Post subject: IR scanning
PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 3:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 2:20 am
Posts: 36
When doing the scan on < 600v mcc cb and starters are these one piece cape type ppe rated for the task. Each hinged cover has to be removed to perform the work and sometimes it's a one man team . At one time they use 2* ppe for the work.
If this is done once a year do we need a permit.

There has been no arc flash study on any equipment to date.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 5:56 am 
Offline
Plasma Level

Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:58 am
Posts: 1103
Location: Charlotte, NC
What is the rating of the PPE? It needs to meet the HRC requirements if you are using the table method.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2011 5:00 am 
Offline
Arc Level

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:49 pm
Posts: 483
Location: New England
If your written policy permits IR scanning as routine work, and you provide periodic training on how to perform it safely, then you do not need the permit. If its not in your policy, and its not considered routine, then you do.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2011 9:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 31, 2009 5:13 am
Posts: 31
toolbbin wrote:
one piece cape type ppe rated for the task.


Long coat designs are protection concerns. For more information please see attached....


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 6:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 6:11 am
Posts: 17
Location: Oregon, USA
haze10 wrote:
If your written policy permits IR scanning as routine work, and you provide periodic training on how to perform it safely, then you do not need the permit. If its not in your policy, and its not considered routine, then you do.

Haze, could I ask for a reference on this. I suppose you base this on a statement somewhere in the NFPA 70E. I acquired the NFPA 70 pdf only a few days ago, and have not had time yet to read it. Thank-you if you could refer me to the basis for this practice.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 7:05 am 
Offline
Arc Level

Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:49 pm
Posts: 483
Location: New England
130.1(B)(1) Commentary in Handbook. "Permits that cover routine work tasks to be performed by trained and qualified employees can be written to cover a long period of time...."


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 10:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 8:10 am
Posts: 36
Aren't certain items exempt from the permit process; troubleshooting, voltage testing, etc.? Would a permit even be required for opening a hinged panel and performing an IR inspection?


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 4:55 am 
Offline
Sparks Level

Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 5:02 am
Posts: 136
MIEngineer wrote:
Aren't certain items exempt from the permit process; troubleshooting, voltage testing, etc.? Would a permit even be required for opening a hinged panel and performing an IR inspection?


Depends on the client you work for as well.. One of the clients I work with requires the permit to be noted ENERGIZED or DE-ENERGIZED. If it is energized LOW RISK (as defined in their HSE Matrix) then you have to have another electrician to sign the permit as a "Technical Authority". If it is not low risk you need a higher level of approval. They built a standard permit for troubleshooting, as most hazzards are similar, and it also includes voltage testing, amp checks, etc. I believe they even built a standard permit for IR scanning.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 5:07 am 
Offline
Sparks Level

Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:19 pm
Posts: 70
Location: Georgia
130.1(B)(3) ...If the purpose of crossing the Limited Approach Boundary is only for visual inspection and the Restricted Approach Boundary will not be crossed, then an energized electrical work permit shall not be required.

Of course appropriate PPE is required.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
© 2017 Arcflash Forum / Brainfiller, Inc. | P.O. Box 12024 | Scottsdale, AZ 85267 USA | 800-874-8883