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 Post subject: Belt
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:57 am 
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Location: Charlotte, NC
Can anyone suggest a suitable belt that can be worn with FR clothing aside from the 100% leather scratchless belt?

Thank you in advance.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 4:32 am 
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70E allows for an "incidental" amount of non-FR material including snaps, name tags, etc. Especially when considering that the "key" area (head and upper torso) is not affected, I haven't ever required anything special with regards to belts. My personal feeling is that a belt made of natural materials (ie leather or cotton) though is probably better than one that is likely to melt and burn well after the arc flash is over.

The only time I've seen non-metal belts required is just to get rid of metal for high power RF. There is nothing in NFPA 70E requiring it that I'm aware of. Or my whole company is in violation (hundreds of people).


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:55 am 
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PaulEngr wrote:
The only time I've seen non-metal belts required is just to get rid of metal for high power RF. There is nothing in NFPA 70E requiring it that I'm aware of. Or my whole company is in violation (hundreds of people).


130.6(E)(1) says take precautions so metal parts in contact with an employee are "handled in a manner that prevents accidental contact with energized electrical conductors or circuit parts". 130.6(E)(2) says metal shall not approach exposed electrical conductors closer than permitted by 130.2, which I understand as "look in Table 130.4(C)".


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 9:54 am 
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My concern stemmed from:
OSHA 1910.333 (c)(8) "Conductive apparel." Conductive articles of jewelry and clothing (such a watchbands, bracelets, rings, key chains, necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth withconductive thread, or metal headgear) may not be worn if they might contactexposed energized parts. However, such articles may be worn if they are rendered
nonconductive by covering, wrapping, or other insulating means.”

I actually found a 100% leather belt with a velcro closure. Thanks for the information though!


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2012 5:21 am 
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Allison White wrote:

I actually found a 100% leather belt with a velcro closure. Thanks for the information though!


Carhartt makes one that most male employees would be happy with. I don't know how many others are out there.

It is a very common work rule to ban pretty much any jewelry due to both concerns about burns and catching rings and watch bands on something. Belts and suspenders are not two items that I routinely see rules for, except around high power transmitters like radar (met more than one electrician that forgot about this and got a nasty RF scar for it). I don't honestly see how you can get into a position where this rule matters though with one exception. If you are doing gloved work, some companies mandate sleeves from 15 kV up to 69 kV (when gloved work stops) but there are no actual requirements for this. Class 4 gloves are bulky but sufficiently long. I have not seen any rubber aprons and I'm not sure I'd trust one so I don't see how you are going to get your rubber protected belly in harm's way to where you would have to worry about suspenders and belts. If you are doing bare hands work, then this is certainly a concern.

OSHA .333 through .339 were adopted from a version of 70E published around 1986 if I recall correctly. Other than some minor edits it hasn't been updated. To fulfill RAGAGEP (recommended and good accepted general engineering practices) principles which are required under the general duties clause most companies adopt 70E as an industry consensus safety standard if they fall under Subchapter S (1910.3xx). Those who fall partially or completely under 1910.269 frequently adopt IEEE C2 (NESC). Both standards organizations are very careful to write their standards to be fully compliant with the regulations. If you implement NFPA 70E in its entirety without modification, you will meet Subchapter S. The only place that NESC (and NFPA 70E) will steer you into trouble is via OSHA 1910.269 in the appendix when working on "comingled" equipment. The two standards organizations are territorial and do not have a joint "alignment" committee. There are many subtle differences between 269 and Subchapter S rules, and those are reflected in the safety Codes which are what the two regulations draw upon for guidance.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2012 3:16 pm 
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Allison White wrote:
My concern stemmed from:
OSHA 1910.333 (c)(8)...might contactexposed energized parts.

You need to read all of the words.

If a belt buckle, or for that matter an underwire bra (yes i have seen policies against them), is in a position to contact exposed energized parts then the worker's body is probably much closer than any of the allowable boundaries, and definitely closer than the 18" working distance assumed for arc flash PEE (<600V).

I understand not wanting to have people make judgement calls for what is or is not acceptable, but zero tolerance doe not have to mean zero intelligence.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:55 am 
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JBD wrote:
You need to read all of the words.

If a belt buckle, or for that matter an underwire bra (yes i have seen policies against them), is in a position to contact exposed energized parts then the worker's body is probably much closer than any of the allowable boundaries, and definitely closer than the 18" working distance assumed for arc flash PEE (<600V).


How would some people be doing repairs?? lol....


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 5:56 am 
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Allison White wrote:
My concern stemmed from:
OSHA 1910.333 (c)(8) "Conductive apparel." Conductive articles of jewelry and clothing (such a watchbands, bracelets, rings, key chains, necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth withconductive thread, or metal headgear) may not be worn if they might contactexposed energized parts. However, such articles may be worn if they are renderednonconductive by covering, wrapping, or other insulating means.”


As an electrician I assumed this was common sense... I don't think I have seen one up here wearing a chain or rings for years...


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 7:07 am 
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glen1971 wrote:
As an electrician I assumed this was common sense... I don't think I have seen one up here wearing a chain or rings for years...


I'm not an electrician and asssumed this was common sense. However I've seen my customers put on FR pants, then throw on a cowboy buckle. When I was asked to supply a belt I just wanted to make sure I selected one that would be safe.

Thanks for the feedback.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2012 6:22 pm 
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Allison White wrote:
I'm not an electrician and asssumed this was common sense. However I've seen my customers put on FR pants, then throw on a cowboy buckle. When I was asked to supply a belt I just wanted to make sure I selected one that would be safe.

Thanks for the feedback.


I don't know that I have noticed the size of some of the dinner plates (lol..) that some may be wearing, but that is a very good point..


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 6:21 am 
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Oberon has a FR Belt with Kevlar.

http://www.cementexusa.com/pdf/FRblackkevlarwebbingadjustablebelts.pdf


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