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 Post subject: Arc Rated Gloves
PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 12:54 pm 
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Location: Canton, OH
Here's my situation:

I am concerned with hand and arm protection for a worker working on energized 208V equipment. The IEEE equations give me a 9.8" three phase arc flash boundary and 0.4 cal (HRC 0). NFPA table 130.7(C)(10) states long sleeve (non melting) shirt and leather gloves. Since I'm working at 208V shock protection states, "Avoid Contact" so rubber gloves are not needed. Leather gloves are needed to provide arc flash protection. The guys performing the work are not thrilled (to say the least) about having to wear leather gloves. Manual dexterity is a big concern and they feel they cannot perform their working wearing the leather gloves. As an alternative to the leather gloves, has anyone had any experience wearing gloves such as these:
http://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/product/Indura-Ultrasoft-Arc-Flash-PPE-Gloves-14.html

Would these be any easier to wear as opposed to Leather gloves?

Thanks.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 5:59 pm 
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Location: Rutland, VT
Looking at the ATPV of 76.2, I would say that these gloves would be even harder to work in than leather gloves. My lineman work in 20kV rubber gloves and leather protectors, they are used to it. My electricians work in Class 0 and Class 00 rubber gloves with leather protectors and they are used to it.

I would try to get several different brands of gloves as samples and see what they like the best. I would have them in rubber gloves with leather protectors for any energized work.

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Barry Donovan, P.E.
www.workplacesafetysolutions.com


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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 12:30 pm 
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Hi,

Actually leather gloves are easier to work in than these arc flash gloves. We sell arc flash too but they are fashioned after steel working gloves and are not the easiest things t use when working with small objects.

I also wanted to address you statement in regards to not needing rubber gloves because you were only working 208v.

OSHA 1910.331 says, "...Safety-related work practices shall be employed to prevent electric shock or other injuries" and 1910.335(a)(1)(i) says, "...Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be provided with, and shall use, electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be protected and for the work to be performed." OSHA is very specific that when working within 3' of 50v or more the worker must protect themselves from shock injury.

The confusion comes from the boundary tables, The "avoid contact" statement is referring to distance not voltage protection.

Further 130.7(C)(6) addresses hand and arm protection and includes the nescessity of wearing insulating rubber gloves.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:22 pm 
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Salisbury is correct, OSHA requires hand protection to prevent shock. That is where the class 00 gloves came from because of the complaints about working in class 0 gloves. I guess you have to use 24" pipe wrenches in panels before someone will be happy with using gloves.

If you search the DOL web site you will find a ruling against Ford Motor Company when one of their employees was injured when cutting through an live wire with side cutters and Ford was not enforcing the rubber gloves and safety glasses throughout the company.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 6:13 am 
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MikeMc wrote:
If you search the DOL web site you will find a ruling against Ford Motor Company when one of their employees was injured when cutting through an live wire with side cutters and Ford was not enforcing the rubber gloves and safety glasses throughout the company.


Yep, that was an epic one, got the whole 70E ball rolling IMO. I did the 70E training for that plant following that accident.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 9:11 am 
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Leather gloves

Hi all,
I need help on leather gloves. When operating a breaker, there is no shock hazrd but there is a flash hazard. the guidance is to wear leather gloves, but that is a pretty wide category. Is there anymore specific guidance on leather gloves? Thanks for your help.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 11:47 am 
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From 70E 130.7(C)(13)FPN : "Heavy-duty leather (e.g. greater than 12 oz/yd2) gloves provide protection suitable up to Hazard/Risk Category 2". That's the only specific guidance that I've seen.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:39 pm 
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Nomex with an ATPV Rating

I recently attended the NETA PowerTest 2010 Conference out in Long Beach, CA. On the second day there was a panel discussion on electrical safety and 70E. One of the participants was Ray Jones, the former chair of the 70E committee. I had a specific question about gloves, and I asked if Nomex gloves which had been assigned an ATPV were appropriate for wear for situations where arc flash protection was required but shock protection was not. The answer I was give was that they indeed were allowable provided the ATPV rating of the gloves matched that of the PPE requirement for the device in question. Nomex gloves are a good alternative to leather in that they offer a much higher level of dexterity. And I got that right from the horse's mouth, so to speak.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:57 am 
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PDS_Dave wrote:
I recently attended the NETA PowerTest 2010 Conference out in Long Beach, CA. On the second day there was a panel discussion on electrical safety and 70E. One of the participants was Ray Jones, the former chair of the 70E committee. I had a specific question about gloves, and I asked if Nomex gloves which had been assigned an ATPV were appropriate for wear for situations where arc flash protection was required but shock protection was not. The answer I was give was that they indeed were allowable provided the ATPV rating of the gloves matched that of the PPE requirement for the device in question. Nomex gloves are a good alternative to leather in that they offer a much higher level of dexterity. And I got that right from the horse's mouth, so to speak.


Yes but keep in mind the Ei on the label is at a certian distance, usually 18". Your hands will likely be much closer than that and the Ei increases exponentially as you get closer. Leather protectors are much better options.


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