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 Post subject: Question of NFPA 70E EEWP exception for Troubleshooting
PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2020 2:15 pm 

Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:11 pm
Posts: 2
I had a question asked of me that I could not find and answer for in the NFPA 70E.
What does the NFPA 70E consider troubleshooting?
An exception to getting an EEWP is troubleshooting but if troubleshooting requires tools it is recommended that insulated tools be used.
So is there anyplace that the NFPA 70E defines what is troubleshooting and where does the line stand for having to get an EEWP?
For example, If I find a blown fuse during troubleshooting a 120 VAC circuit do I have to then put the equipment in an ESWC to put in a new fuse?
Thanks
psears


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 Post subject: Re: Question of NFPA 70E EEWP exception for Troubleshooting
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:56 am 
Sparks Level

Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2014 8:40 am
Posts: 93
Hello

In the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E, in Article 100, Definitions, on the bottom of page 13 where it defines "Working On" you will see the 2 categories of working on. "Diagnostic" (testing) which is considered working on energized conductors and circuit parts is defined there. You will also see "repair" defined also. Further up in the standard in Article 130, page 23 under "Exemptions to the Work Permit" you will see that testing, troubleshootiong is exempt form the EEWP

With regards to the fuse replacement on a 120 Volt circuit, you may have to be a little more descriptive to us. Is this an inline fues perhaps? Is there a type of disconnecting means that would isolate the fuse from incoming power? Neverthless if you are installing/ removing a fuse I would at least isolate and test for the absence of voltage prior to installing

I hope that this helps
All the Best


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 Post subject: Re: Question of NFPA 70E EEWP exception for Troubleshooting
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:34 am 
Sparks Level

Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:35 pm
Posts: 134
The short answer is trouble shooting is the same as testing. Maintenance means you are adjusting or removing and replacing. Your trouble shooting involves touching with meter leads or inspecting. At no time are you doing anything other that attempting to find a fault. Once you find the fault, then it becomes maintenance and you must shut off power.
An example is locating a blown fuse which is testing. You cannot remove or install a new fuse with the power on.
Suppose you find a bad connection. The process of finding that bad connection is testing because you are not adjusting or repairing that connection. Once you have determined that bad connection is the problem, to fix it you must shut power off.
The only time an energized work permit can be used is if it is determined shutting power off is more hazardous than leaving it on.


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 Post subject: Re: Question of NFPA 70E EEWP exception for Troubleshooting
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 6:57 am 

Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:11 pm
Posts: 2
Thanks for the clarifications.
The question came up during a discussion about on-site troubleshooting and commissioning of switchgear and when and if an EEWP was required to do the work.
In the process of locating the fault or verifying the circuit, the technicians will remove fuses, disconnect plugs and lift energized terminations.
The justification is that the control voltage is 120 VAC and does not reflect an Arc Flash Condition and therefore a EEWP is not required.
The general attitude is that the EEWP exceptions allowing testing, troubleshooting and voltage measuring also allows the technician to perform these tasks while the power is on.
The question of what is the NFPA definition of troubleshooting then comes up as does at what point during these procedures does an EEWP need to be utilized.

psears


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 Post subject: Re: Question of NFPA 70E EEWP exception for Troubleshooting
PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:09 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:35 am
Posts: 521
Location: Wisconsin
psears wrote:
.... does not reflect an Arc Flash Condition and therefore a EEWP is not required.


I see this often. People only focused on arc flash and seem to ignore the shock hazard.

EEWP is about recognizing and addressing all hazards.
I believe more people are injured by electrical shock and falls, than by an arc flash.


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