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 Post subject: IEEE 1584.1-2013
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:06 pm 
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Hello, good afternoon.

Does the standard contain new information to consider for arc flash analysis?

Thank you


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 Post subject: Re: IEEE 1584.1-2013
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:14 pm 
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Nerf wrote:
Hello, good afternoon.

Does the standard contain new information to consider for arc flash analysis?

Thank you


No because we're still on the 2002 edition. The new edition won't get released until probably next year at the earliest.

As to answering your question, sort of yes and no. Three areas I know will change somewhat:
1. The "lower cutoff" (the old 125 kVA comment/rule) will likely change, probably downward in terms of what is "covered" under this exception but also it sounds like the "1 transformer" part may change to something a little more flexible such as a simple bolted fault cutoff.
2. They have a lot more data to work with. It is my understanding that the 2002 equations are within about 10-15% of the new equations. I've seen 3 possible new equations. The first is that EPRI and others have expanded into other areas for "device specific" equations so even though that's the section that sees little attention, it might change. Second there's the Wilkins simplified as well as the Wilkins time-domain models. In the past IEEE 1584 kind of covered everything out there and I wouldn't be surprised if this one does something similar so both get honorable mentions. Both models fit the data a little better. The time domain model is the best but computationally complex to use. Finally I've heard that they are getting away from the "jump" that occurs at 1 kV due to the implementation differences between the medium voltage and low voltage models in terms of having a single empirical calculation or at least one that passes through the same point at 1 kV.
3. There has been a lot of discussion and rumbling about a lot more conditons/situations such as having more than just the existing 3 box cases and including electrode orientation which accounts for very problematic situations such as some switchgear. I'd expect that this is where the data gathering is going to have to increase substantially. Everything else just revises the model a bit.

And in terms of the research...we're starting to see tests coming out that do things like look at the effect of having a substantial mass of material inside the box...such as a draw out breaker or an MCC bucket. These draastically reduce the incident energy but I doubt that anything beyond the same "open box" models will make it into this edition.


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 Post subject: Re: IEEE 1584.1-2013
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:44 am 
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The standard being referenced in the subject is not the one containing the equations (IEEE 1584-2002) but rather the std which is a guide for the specification of scope and deliverables for an arc flash study done in accordance with IEEE 1584. As such it would not contain any new equations or exemptions for an arc flash study.

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 Post subject: Re: IEEE 1584.1-2013
PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2017 1:05 pm 
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Nerf wrote:
Hello, good afternoon.

Does the standard contain new information to consider for arc flash analysis?

Thank you


As WBD mentioned, IEEE 1584.1 (Dot-One as we call call it) is about what should be included in an arc flash study. A good friend and colleague and I wrote the original first draft years ago and then the IEEE Working Group got it to what we have today.

IEEE 1584 (no dot) is still the 2002 edition. Paul has some great info. So far we have many different equations proposed. 2002 was based on electrodes oriented vertically. The proposed new model has electrodes in the vertical, horizontal, vertical with a barrier, and box vs open air configurations. There will be possible other changes as well. If anyone is attending the IEEE Electrical Safety Workshop in Reno, Nevada in a few weeks, this working group meets the Monday preceding ESW and is an open meeting.

.....and on to my normal required disclaimer - I'm the Secretary of IEEE 1584 but these comments are my own and don't necessarily reflect any official position of IEEE.


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