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 Post subject: Calculations for 132kV/300 kV
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:51 am 
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As I understand the IEEE1584 method is only valid up to 15 kV. What is the best/easiest method for estimating safe distance and energy for an 300 kV outdoor switch gear(typical overhead lines and circuit breaker).
Any advise about witch software or standard to buy(cheaper is better since this is only one calculation).
Very thankful for any good advice


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 Post subject: Re: Calculations for 132kV/300 kV
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:14 pm 
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Location: Rutland, VT
You don't say where you are from but if in the United States you would be under OSHA 1910.269 regulations. In those regulations, OSHA lists the use of ArcPro for >15kV.

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 Post subject: Re: Calculations for 132kV/300 kV
PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 1:03 am 
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Sorry about that. This is in Europe. As I understand just by reading in this excelent forum there are two ways to calculate arc flash in high voltage systems(typically 60, 130, 300 kV). One is to use ETAP the other is ArcPro(?).

Anyone know if this recognized in Europe?

What is the difference between this methoods?

I must say there are very much knowledge and firendly people on this forum. A place for making the world a safer place :D


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 Post subject: Re: Calculations for 132kV/300 kV
PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:04 pm 
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ETAP reverts to Lee.

There are basically 3 models out there for 115 or 300 kV: Duke Heat Flux, ArcPro, and Lee.

Lee is actually in the IEEE 1584 standard. In fact there are 3 different models in IEEE 1584-2002. One is Lee and that one doesn't have a voltage or current limit. One is the empirical formulas which is what is generally referred to as "IEEE 1584" even though it is just one of several models. The third is a set of simple equations developed by Mersen that do a really good job for low voltage current limiting fuses but they are rarely used.

Duke Heat Flux and Arcpro are proprietary computer programs. Duke Heat Flux is free and readily available although it was written to run on older Windows software so you might have to run it on a virtual machine since I'm not sure if it will even run on current Windows operating system software. Arcpro costs money but runs on curent Windows software.

In terms of the results, Lee will give wild and crazy and basically invalid and very high results. Duke Heat Flux will give a lower result and Arcpro will give something higher than Duke but definitely lower than Lee.

So I guess at this point it depends on your goal. If your goal is to provide the most popular and best result, then either purchase Arcpro or find someone that can run the calculation for you since you need a single result. If you don't mind a crazy high value and when I say this, I mean that you can live with the crazy result, Lee is priced right since the IEEE paper is free and widely available and you can practiaclly "Goggle" the equation. So I'd go ahead and suggest running the numbers through Lee and see if you feel comfortable with the result. If so even knowing it is much higher than the real result, at least you know that you have produced a "conservative" result. Finally since this in Europe another option would be Duke Heat Flux. The result will be low and seems to be questionably low but since all 3 models are equally weighted in terms of their credibility, you could just run Duke Heat flux and use the result. It will be low but anything at 115 or 300 kV is just guessing anyways. In overhead switchgear in general arc flash isn't much of a hazard anyways. Unless it is obstructed in some way, arcs will be magnetically propelled down the line away from the power source so even if an arcing fault occurred, it is most likely going to travel further down the line away from the initial fault at hundreds of feet per second.


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