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NFPA 70E – 2018 – Qualified Worker Training – 2 Days

Course No.: ES201
CEUs 1.6

Tickets

28 available
Cleveland, OH$895.00April 9 - 10, 2018
31 available
San Francisco, CA$895.00June 14 - 15, 2018
27 available
Philadelphia, PA$895.00September 27 - 28, 2018

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Conference1This intensive 2 day  2018 NFPA 70E  Training Class covers the details of the 2018 Edition of  NFPA 70E  and OSHA requirements. Understand how to perform a shock and arc flash risk assessment, use energized electrical work permits, select PPE, understand arc flash labels, know what to do when working within the arc flash boundary and much more. Changes that have occurred with the 2018 Edition include greater emphasis on the Risk Assessment, Elimination of the 40 cal/cm2 Informational Note, a new exception where details such as the Arc Flash Boundary and PPE may not be required to be listed on the Arc Flash Label, New definitions for Electrical Safety Program, Condition of Maintenance, Working Distance and many revised definitions, Major re-organizations of Article 120 and many other revisions, additions and changes!

Jim Phillips is not just another trainer reading a script.   Jim’s training is based on his insider’s view from holding many leadership positions for the development of various electrical safety standards coupled with his arc flash testing experience and broad electrical power background.  This provides him a unique perspective from the inside – a perspective he loves sharing with others. When asked questions about some topics, his explanations often run along the line of “Well, here’s what happened in the lab when we blew it up…”

Here is a sample of Jim’s involvement.

Vice Chair – IEEE 1584 – IEEE Guide for Performing Arc Flash Calculations
International Chair – Geneva, Switzerland based,  IEC TC78 Live Working – 40+ global standards including many for arc flash.
IEEE/NFPA Arc Flash Collaborative Research Project – Member of the Steering Committee
Author of Complete Guide to Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculation Studies

For a summary of the 2018 changes to NFPA 70E based on Jim’s article published in the multi-award winning Electrical Contractor Magazine, [CLICK HERE]

[Learn more about Jim Phillips]

Watch Jim explain why electrical equipment’s doors are not considered as protection from an arc flash.  One of his arc flash tests illustrates how doors can blow open during an arc flash.


INTRODUCTION TO 2018 NFPA 70E
Overview of the Global Changes, Significant Changes and the Revision Process

ELECTRICAL HAZARDS – HUMAN EFFECTS
Physiological Effects, Tissue Damage, Internal Organ Damage, Burns, Fibrillation, “Curable” Second Degree Burn Requirements, Arc Blast Pressure, Sound Pressure, Incident Energy and 1.2 Calories/cm2

ROLE OF OTHER CODES AND STANDARDS
OSHA 29 CFR – Part 1910, Subpart S, NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, 2018 NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, IEEE Standard 1584™, IEEE Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations, Legal Requirements, Liability

CATEGORIES OF ELECTRICAL HAZARDS
Electric Shock, Arc Flash, Arc Blast, Sound Pressure, Shrapnel, UV Light

ARTICLE 90 – INTRODUCTION

90.1 Purpose
Purpose of Standard

90.2 Scope
Covered and Not Covered

90.3 Standard Arrangement
Overview of Standard’s Organization

90.4 Mandatory and Permissive Rules and Explanatory Material
Shall, Shall Not, Required, Permitted

90.5 Informative Annexes
Non-mandatory Information

ARTICLE 100 – DEFINITIONS

Major Definitions, Revisions, New Additions

ARTICLE 105 – APPLICATION OF SAFETY-RELATED WORK PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES

105.1 Scope
Electrical Safety Related Work Practices

105.2 Purpose
Intended to Provide for Employee Safety Relative to Electrical Hazards in the Work Place

105.3 Responsibility
Employee and Employer

105.4 Priority
Hazard Elimination

105.5 Organization
General overview of Chapter 1

ARTICLE 110 – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY RELATED WORK PRACTICES

Discussion of Requirements Relocated from Other Articles

110.1 Electrical Safety Program
Overview of Changes, General, Inspection (New), Awareness and Self Discipline, Electrical Safety Program Principles, Controls and Procedures, Risk Assessment Procedure, Job Safety Planning and Job Briefing, Incident Investigation (New), Auditing

110.2 Electrical Training Requirements
Electrical Safety Training, Qualified Person, Lockout/Tagout Procedure Training, Emergency Response Training,

110.3 Host and Contract Employers’ Responsibilities
Host Employer Responsibilities, Contract Employer Responsibilities, Documentation

110.4 Test Instruments and Equipment
Testing, Rating, Design, Visual Inspection and Repair, Operation Verification

110.5 Portable Cord and Plug Connected Equipment
Handling and Storage, Grounding-Type Equipment, Visual Inspection and Repair of Portable Cord and Plug Connected Equipment and Flexible Cord Sets, Conductive Work Locations, Connecting Attachment Plugs, Manufacturer’s Instructions

110.6 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection
General, Maintenance and Construction, Outdoors, Testing Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection Devices

ARTICLE 120 ESTABLISHING AN ELECTRICALLY SAFE WORK CONDITION

Overview of Reorganization of Article 120

120.1 Lockout/Tagout Program
General, Employer Responsibilities

120.2 Lockout/Tagout Principles
General, Employee Involvement, Lockout/Tagout Procedure, Control of Energy, Electrical Circuit Interlocks, Control Devices, Identification, Coordination, Forms of Energy Control

120.3 Lockout/Tagout Equipment
Lock Application, Lockout/Tagout Device, Lockout Device, Tagout Device

120.4 Lockout/Tagout Procedures
Planning, Locating Sources, Person in Charge, Simple Lockout/Tagout Procedure,Complex Lockout/Tagout Procedure, Elements of Control 

120.5 Process for Establishing and Verifying an Electrically Safe Work Condition
Verification Steps, Methods Used, PPE to be Worn During Procedure

ARTICLE 130 WORK INVOLVING ELECTRICAL HAZARDS

130.1 Electrically Safe Work Conditions
General – When an Electrically Safe Work Condition Must be Established

130.2 Electrically Safe Work Conditions
Energized Work, Energized Electrical Work Permit, Elements of Work Permit, Exemptions to Work Permit

130.3 Working While Exposed to Electrical Hazards
Safety Related Work Practice Requirements

130.4 Shock Risk Assessment
Reorganization Overview, General, Shock Risk Assessment, Additional Protective Measures, Shock PPE, Documentation, Shock Protection Boundaries, Limited Approach Boundary, Restricted Approach Boundary

130.5 Arc Flash Risk Assessment
Reorganization Overview, General, Estimate of Likelihood of Severity, Arc Flash Risk Assessment, Additional Protective Measures, Documentation, Arc Flash Boundary, Arc Flash PPE, Incident Energy Analysis Method, IEEE 1584, Effect of Arc Flash Duration, Time Current Curves and Protective Devices, Incident Energy and Distance,  Selection of Arc Rated Clothing And PPE. Equipment Labeling, Exception for No Detail on Labels (New)

130.6 Other Precautions for Personnel Activites
Alertness, Blind Reaching, Illumination, Conductive Articles Being Worn, Conductive Materials, Tools and Equipment Being Handled, Confined or Enclosed Work Spaces, Doors and Hinged Panels, Clear Spaces, Housekeeping Duties, Occasional Use of Flammable Materials, Anticipating Failure, Routine Opening and Closing of Circuit s, Reclosing Circuit After Protective Device Operation, Safety Interlocks

130.7 Personal and Other Protective Equipment
General, Care of Equipment, Personal Protective Equipment, Arc Rated Clothing,  ASTM Testing, Face Protection, Hand Protection, Foot Protection, Head, Face, Neck and Chin Protection, Eye and Hearing Protection, Deletion of PPE Standards from Mandatory Text (New)

130.8 Work Withing the Limited Approach Boundary or Arc Flash Boundary of Overhead Lines

CHAPTER 2 -SAFETY RELATED MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS

General, Protective Devices, Fuses and Circuit Breakers, Battery Rooms

CHAPTER 3 SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

Electrolytic Cells, Use of Lasers, Power Electronic Equipment, Electrician Safety Authority

OVERVIEW OF INFORMATIVE ANNEXES

 

Why is NFPA 70E Such an Important Standard?

According to OSHA 1910.132(d) The employer is responsible to assess the hazards in the work

Jim is setting up an arc flash test.

Jim is setting up an arc flash test.

place, select, have, and use the correct Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and document the assessment. The use of NFPA 70E and other related industry consensus standards has been used to demonstrate whether an employer acted reasonably when there is a possible OSHA enforcement action taken.

So although NFPA 70E is not directly part of OSHA standards, it can be used as evidence of whether an employer acted reasonably in complying with OSHA standards and addressing “recognized hazards”.

There are more specific links within the OSHA standards as well. A typical example is found in 1910.335, Safeguards for personnel protection which requires: “(a)(1)(i) Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be provided with, and shall use, electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be protected and for the work to be performed.”

This regulation requires that employees must be properly protected from potential electrical hazards, by using adequate PPE, but it does not provide specific detail of what specific personal protective equipment is necessary to achieve the objective. NFPA 70E is used to define the specific details and requirements.


Questions?

Brain LogoFor questions, registration information or to discuss holding this class at your location as an on-site training program, contact our Program Director at 800.874.8883

Brainfiller, Inc. | P.O. Box 12024 | Scottsdale, AZ 85267